Videos that help both teachers and students are a win-win. "We wanted to produce a resource that could have a multipurpose use," says First Grade Buddies.

This week, we’re showcasing Reader Ready Video Lesson RL 1.4: Words That Appeal to Senses/Feeling Words from First Grade Buddies.

Creating videos that can help both teachers and students is a win-win. This video is the first in a series from First Grade Buddies where teachers can watch the video to learn how to best implement the technique or they can show the video directly to the students.

Here’s what we noticed:

  • First Grade Buddies has a strong product description that provides information on exactly what’s included in both the video and the supporting document.
  • The supporting document includes shorter snippets of the video that a teacher can download and share with students. This is a great idea while video is still streaming on the site.

 

1. What inspired you to start creating Video on TpT?

We are inspired by the new element of learning that videos can offer. We wanted to produce a resource that could have a multipurpose use — teachers can watch for lesson ideas, students can watch as a lesson, and teachers can send home the video for students who were out of class or need more support. We made our video to align with a recent blog series we created, Reader Ready. In addition to sharing lesson ideas and resources on our blog, we now have the video as an additional tool for teaching the ELA standard. We are continuing to create videos for the remaining standards we covered in our blog series. For those who follow, they can get a fully comprehensive set of resources and products for teaching the standard; a video, free lesson resources and ideas on the blog, and printable resources in our TpT store.

 

Videos that help both teachers and students are a win-win. "We wanted to produce a resource that could have a multipurpose use," says First Grade Buddies.
Planning your script is one of the most important steps in the process

2. What steps did you take prior to filming your video?

We started with a planning session. We selected a reading standard and coordinating blog post to use for our video. We created a lesson plan containing activities to teach the standard. Our work included writing poems, thinking of specific questions that we would ask to align with the standard, creating printables to go along with the lesson, and deciding on the timing for each part of the lesson. We mapped out what the video would look like by creating a PowerPoint document of our lesson. The PowerPoint had graphics, transitions, and actions (such as highlighting specific parts of the poem) with specific timing. From that, we created a script. We used the script to help us speak clearly and precisely.

 

Videos that help both teachers and students are a win-win. "We wanted to produce a resource that could have a multipurpose use," says First Grade Buddies.
It can take a little research to figure out what will work best for your project

3. What was the most challenging part of the process?

Once we decided to create our video as a PowerPoint document, we thought we had all of our work figured out. We thought it would be clicking a few buttons and that would result in a finished product! However, once we sat down to “record” the PowerPoint, we realized it wasn’t easily done. This required us to find methods and applications that would help us. Turns out, we needed to do quite a bit more research, including finding tutorials on YouTube. We tried multiple methods and settled on one that worked the best for our project.

 

4. What software did you use to create your video? Were there any new tips or tricks that you learned in the process?

We used QuickTime Player on Mac to do a screen recording of our PowerPoint presentation. After we made the screen recording, we used iMovie to edit the video and add our audio recordings. After we finished creating the entire video, we wanted to split the video into different sections. We re-recorded the audio portions with QuickTime Player as audio recordings and uploaded them to iTunes. In this format, we were able to insert them to our video clips in iMovie much easier and create an entire one-piece video as well as several video clips.

 

Videos that help both teachers and students are a win-win. "We wanted to produce a resource that could have a multipurpose use," says First Grade Buddies.
Microphones can make a huge difference in your video quality

5. Is there one piece of equipment that you’d recommend? Why?

A microphone! It was necessary to cut out background feedback noise while we were recording. We used a Snowball brand “Blue” style microphone that we purchased from Best Buy.