This post originally appeared on the blog Lucky Little Learners.

Task cards are the perfect way to prepare for a test, practice skills in small groups during centers, or even to use individually as an early finisher. Task cards are becoming a must have staple in the classroom and because of this, it’s important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren’t frustrated every time you go to pull a set.

Having an organized system is essential. There’s something about the ability to think of a skill, go to your system, pull it out quickly, and move on with the lesson planning process. Over the past 13 years, I have evolved with the way task cards are organized. I am going to walk you through the pros and cons of each.

Recipe Card Holders

PROS: Recipe card holders are affordable and easy to find.

CONS: Recipe card holders are not very durable and if the students are pulling out a set, it is likely that other sets will fall to the floor. I also don’t like that the task cards are not all kept in the same place. Typical recipe card holders such as the one pictured below, hold approximately six different sets of task cards. I also think that it’s a bit tough to see which skill is in each section at a quick glance.

It's important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren't frustrated every time you go to pull a set. Here are 3 ingenious ideas.

QR Code Math Task Card Bundle
Math Task Card Bundle

Plastic Bags

PROS: Plastic bags are very affordable and easy to find. They are also great for being able to see which skill is in each bag. Task cards in plastic bags are also easy to store in a file folder, drawer, basket, tote, etc.

CONS: Plastic bags aren’t a very durable option due to the bags ripping from the handling of the kids. I also think that plastic bags can be a bit of a messy option because they slide all over when there are several sets to be storing.

It's important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren't frustrated every time you go to pull a set. Here are 3 ingenious ideas.

QR Code Math Task Card Bundle
Math Task Card Bundle

Photo & Craft Boxes

PROS: Very durable, love the option of having the students grab and go (portable), very organized, looks nice, ability to see what skill is in each box, doesn’t take up a ton of space.

CONS: These storage boxes can be a bit expensive. I purchased mine off Amazon and spent $36.99. That being said, the durability and longevity of this system is worth the investment. 

It's important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren't frustrated every time you go to pull a set. Here are 3 ingenious ideas.

QR Code Math Task Card Bundle
Math Task Card Bundle

Do you have any other storage and organization ideas? I’d love to hear from you! Email me at angie@luckylittlelearners.com to share your ideas.

It's important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren't frustrated every time you go to pull a set. Here are 3 ingenious ideas.

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It's important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren't frustrated every time you go to pull a set. Here are 3 ingenious ideas.

 

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It's important to have an organizational system for your task cards so you aren't frustrated every time you go to pull a set. Here are 3 ingenious ideas.Angie Olson, author of Lucky Little Learners, has a passion for helping busy teachers find resources to help supplement their curriculum. Angie has been teaching for thirteen years and has taught kindergarten, first, and second grade. She has a master’s degree in mathematics which is reflective of the type of resources she likes to create for teachers in her Teachers Pay Teachers store. She lives in Minnesota with her daughter and husband. She loves to travel, read, and spend time with her family. Join Angie in her Facebook group for 2nd grade teachers to collaborate, share ideas, and be inspired.